all about sprouting

Hey Postmodernhood readers! Eleni here from My Nourished Vibes and I’m so happy to be back today!

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. All nuts, seeds and grains are *indigestible* until they are soaked or sprouted. Gasp! I know, it’s a really hard truth to swallow! But I am here for you friend, and I am glad to restore your relationship with the lost practices of ancient times…

sprouting feature

Mother Nature is one smart goddess. When we work with her rhythms and follow her guidance, we are well. When we try to manipulate things, we pretty much end up with a mess. She has thought of everything, ensuring that no energy would ever be wasted in producing the abundance of life all around us.

The perfect example…inside each nut, seed and grain lay all the nutrients to produce a new plant. But these nutrients are locked away by enzyme inhibitors, patiently lying dormant as they wait for the right condition to be released, ensuring valuable energy is not wasted. When the seed, nut or grain is soaked in water for twelve hours, indicating that it is the perfect environment to release it’s energy and grow into a plant, the nutrients are unlocked and become available to grow a new plant. In our case as humans, this means the nutrients are now available for absorption in our digestive tract. When eaten with out this practice, we do not receive the nutrients and digesting them actually becomes a burden on our body. Because our modern culture is more concerned with convenience, sadly this ancient practice has been left behind. But it is so simple you can start today!

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Here’s my super simple steps to sprout lentils! This same basic process should be used for all other nuts, seeds, beans and grains, to obtain all the nutrients they offer. Keep in mind that wet almonds are as appetizing as they sound… 😉 After nuts have been soaked, to achieve a crunchy texture again, toss them with a little sea salt and dry them out in the oven or dehydrator for a few hours. Chia seeds and flax seeds are the easiest! Within two hours of their soak time, they become a gel. Store the gel in the fridge for up to two weeks, and you have all those nutrients just waiting on you to be added to smoothies, yogurt or baking!

                                                                       Sprouted Lentils

1 bag dry lentils

filtered water

dash sea salt

*Pour lentils into large bowl and cover with filtered water. Stir in a dash of sea salt (this helps break down the enzyme inhibitors). Cover and let sit at room temperature for 12-24 hours while mother nature does her job.

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*When soak time is over, drain and rinse the lentils. Their nutrients are now available and ready to be cooked. Pour in a pot and cover with filtered water and sea salt to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer covered for about 40 minutes. Or you can choose to make them even more nutrient dense, and allow them to sprout….

*After rinsing, leave the lentils in a strainer and place a towel over the top to cover, but still allow air flow. Place the strainer over a bowl to catch the access water, and leave it on the counter.

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*Every couple of hours thoroughly rinse the lentils under the sink and give them a good stir to ensure everyone’s had a drink, while also dumping out any water in the bowl. Place back on the bowl to strain and repeat for 1-3 days.

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*the more days you continue this process, the longer the tail will get and will become soft enough to eat raw. I like to sprout until that tiny little green leaf appears. At this point it has so many raw enzymes, it will be digested like a vegetable instead of a heavy starch. It’s like magic every time! And the flavor is so much richer at this point!

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*To enjoy raw in salads, sandwiches etc, sprouted lentils will stay fresh for a week in the fridge. Store in an air tight container along with a paper towel to absorb the extra moisture.

*To cook, pour in a pot and cover with filtered water and sea salt to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer covered for 20 minutes.

 

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See, wasn’t that easy? Now, go get your sprout on! 😉

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